A Fair Trade Bus Ride…

How about this for a “Fair” trade…a Bus for a Bike?

It would have to be a very special bus for me to part company with Edna, my very trusty Surly Long Haul Trucker. But as I’ve learned so often along the way, things happen unexpectedly and plans change as a matter of course. Edna has done me very well. We made a good team, we got through the hard and bad times together and came out rosy, eventually, in Panama City. Some 9,200 km after leaving Vancouver eight months ago.

But Edna and I decided it’s time to take a break from each other. I’ve had my ladies along the way (Gemini, Agnes) though there’s only one lady now so it’s best for Edna to get back to Vancouver and have some rest. She’s in good hands.

Amazingly, time is running short for me and I’ve got plenty I’d like to see in South America. Santiago, Chile, was my original destination (though I chose it somewhat arbitrarily), but that looked unrealistic a couple of months ago. Getting from Panama to Colombia is incredibly foolhardy to attempt by bicycle (if it’s even possible). For me, my trip has been much more about the Fair Trade than the cycling, so it wasn’t a hard decision to take in deciding to fly to Bogota and make the rest of my trip by bus.

It’ll certainly be different. I have one very heavy bag now instead of four or five, I can’t nip around a town quickly and easily any more, or stop in random interesting places by the roadside. But I’m looking forward to a change and seeing how easily I can find some more Fair Trade visits.

A Fair Trade Bike Bus Ride…four wheels, not two.

Edna Ruth Byler and 65 years of Ten Thousand Villages

If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you’ll know that I named my bike Edna. The inspiration for the name came from Edna Ruth Byler, generally regarded as the founder of the modern Fair Trade movement. Well, 1st October was the 65th anniversary of Ten Thousand Villages, the current organisation that was founded upon Edna’s earlier work.

http://youtu.be/Vi1rMmDhWHI

Less well known is that she had some skill in the kitchen, if her cookbook and baking classes are anything to go by.One of her master recipes below is an inspiration at annual MCC relief sales. Edna’s famous recipe can be found on page 65 of the More-With-Less Cookbook.

October is Fair Trade Month (in the USA) so if you can, make a little extra effort and try to find a Fair Trade product to buy instead of your usual purchases. I can virtually guarantee it won’t be as hard as you think!

http://www.tenthousandvillages.ca/cgi-bin/category.cgi?type=store&item=pageZAAAG13&template=fullpage-en&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=65th+Newsletter+English&utm_content=65th+Newsletter+English+CID_b828d41e6a00db86dffb3d1ebc36868d&utm_source=Email+Marketing+Software&utm_term=Edna+Ruth+Bylers+Baked+Goods+Recipe

You can find out more by following the link above, and if you’re impatient to get started on her recipe, here are some instructions. I’m pretty sure Edna wasn’t vegan but these can easily be improved (sorry, I mean adapted) to cater for vegan tastes.

It’s Fair Trade Month in the USA and there are a number of events this month in Vancouver, culminating with Halloween so be sure to buy your Fair Trade chocolate this month!

http://fairtrade.ca/

http://fairtradeusa.org/

RECIPES (note that Edna is clearly from the ‘old school’ – who has a deep fryer or uses shortening these days!?)

Produces 100 doughnuts or rolls.

Preheat an oven to 400º or deep fryer to 375º, depending on recipe

Dissolve:
3 pkg. dry yeast in
1 c. lukewarm water

Mix in large bowl: 1 qt. scalded milk
2 c. mashed potatoes (no milk added)
1/2 c. butter
1/2 c. margarine
1 c. sugar

Let cool to lukewarm, then add:
yeast mixture
6 c. flour

Let stand until mixture foams up (about 20 minutes)

Add:
2 eggs, beaten
1 T. salt
11-12 c. additional flour

A little more flour may be needed, but dough should be soft. Turn out on floured board and knead until satiny. Let raise in warm place until doubled in bulk.

Doughnuts: Roll out dough, cut doughnuts, place on trays and let raise until not quite double. Fry in hot shortening (375º). When drained and while still hot dip in glaze mixture. Insert a stick through holes and let a number of doughnuts drain over glaze bowl until next ones are ready to do.

Glaze
Combine:
1 lb. powdered sugar
1 T. margarine
1 t. vanilla
dash of mace
enough rich milk to make thin icing 

Cinnamon buns: Prepare a mixture of butter and margarine and a mixture of sugar, brown sugar, and cinnamon. Roll a piece of dough to about 18×9″. Spread dough with butter mixture and sprinkle on some of the sugar mixture. Roll up the dough as for a jelly roll. Cut 1 ½” chunks and place in greased pans, pressing down lightly on each chunk. Cover and let rise in warm place until nearly double in size. Bake at 400º for 15-20 minutes or until browned. These may be iced with doughnut glaze as soon as they are taken from the oven.

Sticky buns: Handle dough same as for cinnamon buns, except make a mixture of brown and white sugar, cinnamon, and a little white corn syrup and water. Spread in bottom of heavily greased pans with nuts, if desired, before putting in rolls. Immediately after baking, invert pans over trays and let syrup run down before removing pans.

Dinner rolls: Shape dough as desired, place on greased pans, and bake at 400º starting on a lower rack and changing to upper rack about halfway through for 15 minutes of baking time. Brush tops lightly with butter to remove any floury appearance.

Coffee cake: A good way to use all the leftover bits of dough – put dough in greased pan, dab or punch holes in it, and spread leftover sugar, syrup, or butter mixtures over. Let raise and bake as for cinnamon buns. 

To freeze: Let baked goods cool. Wrap or place in large plastic bags freeze the same day.